High School Student Peace Conference in the USA

High School Student Peace Conference in the USA

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Production members of "Hiroshima Archive", Ms. Namikawa (3rd year student of Hiroshima Jogakuin High School) and Ms. Tokuyama (alumna) attended to the ceremony of President Obama's visit to Hiroshima, by a request of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

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President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima:
Passing on memories of the atomic bomb in digital form - Raising funds for holding the High School Student Peace Conference in the United States of America

On July 27, 2016, President Obama will be the first current U.S. president to visit Hiroshima. This historic event could be the impetus for the abolishment of atomic weapons that people all around the world are hoping for.

It's desired to expand our scope from Japan to the world and consider the state of "Nuclear and humanity".

Those of us involved in the Nagasaki/Hiroshima Archives would like to use this opportunity to send high school students from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to the United States to hold the Japan-U.S. High School Student Peace Conference. Participants in the conference will include Japanese and American high school students, as well as the public and atomic bomb victims living in the U.S.

"The Hiroshima Archive" and "The Nagasaki Archive" will be used at the conference as a collection of digital content on the dropping of the atomic bomb. These digital tools assist in understanding and stimulating the interest of the audience. It will provide an environment where high school students, the public, and atomic bomb survivors will surround a table where they can discuss and deepen their knowledge of the history of the atomic bomb and the Pacific War.

 

The conference will consist of sending high school students from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to the U.S. cities of Boston and New York where atomic bomb survivors living in the United States will provide lectures. The Hiroshima Archive and Nagasaki Archive will also be available for hands-on use via tablets and smartphones along with discussions between atomic bomb survivors, students, and the public.

We are confident that it will help to foster understanding of the dangers of nuclear war, and raise a new generation of young people committed to peace around the world.

The crowdfunding for this project will go toward covering travel expenses for sending high school students and graduate student tutors to the United States, costs involved in holding local workshops, and lectures from atomic bomb survivors living in the States.

- Tentative dates: September 19 to 22, 2016

- Tentative locations: Boston and New York City

We are now nearing the sixth year in our efforts to pass on memories so that future generations can remember the realities of nuclear war.

The year 2010 marked 65 years since the atomic bombs were dropped on Japan. As third generation descendants of the original atomic bomb survivors, we decided that we wanted to send a message to the rest of the world. "The Nagasaki Archive" was also born in July 2010, based on technologies developed at the Hidenori Watanave Laboratory at Tokyo Metropolitan University.

Directly after the Nagasaki Archive was released, it received over 200,000 page views in a single day, becoming a popular topic among media outlets in various countries. New war and disaster archives went live one after the other, starting with "the Hiroshima Archive" the following year in 2011, later including archives on the Battle of Okinawa and the Great East Japan Earthquake.

Meaning of the archives: A way to link new memories

(1)From studying a single "point" to studying a "surface"

These archives are tools that provide a new way to study and pass on the message of peace by switching from the study of a single ‘point’ when viewing materials such as individual photos and testimonies, to allowing students to grasp and come into contact with the realities of nuclear war in three-dimensional maps and overall pictures by studying a ‘surface’, such as provided by the archives.

(2)Providing a way to study anytime, anywhere rather than the need to be on site to learn

Through the archives, people from around the world can learn about the realities of nuclear war anytime, anywhere. This point has garnered the attention of media all around the world, and has been reported in newspapers and on TV. Instead of going to a museum where you need to be onsite to learn about the history of nuclear warfare, you can now learn anytime, anywhere.

(3)From passive peace studies to proactive peace studies

Arousing interest in the dropping of atomic bombs seventy years ago is no easy task. Times change, and the traditional passive way of learning has resulted in less interest in events of the past. The archives provide a proactive way for youngsters to learn about history via familiar means such as computers, smartphones and tablets.

Creating a "memory" community through the workshop

The Hiroshima Archive and Nagasaki Archive have great potential as tools for peace studies. Locally in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, atomic bomb survivors and youngsters have joined together to create a Memory Community based on the archive.

In Hiroshima, workshops run by local high school students, atomic bomb survivors, and the archive creators are held on a continuing basis. This has resulted in a shift from passive peace studies where learners simply look at documents, to proactive studies, where learners become an active agent, participating in keeping memories alive.

- Hiroshima Archive - Cesium Showcase

Last year our crowdfunding funds were used to hold a workshop in Nagasaki. The high school students, public, and atomic bomb survivors gathered around a table and utilized the archive to have a discussion.

- Our crowdfunding in 2015

From Hiroshima and Nagasaki to the U.S.A.!

With President Obama visiting Hiroshima this year, we realized that we wanted to send Japanese high school students to the United States. By having youngsters hold the Japan-U.S. High School Student Peace Conference in the United States, knowledge on the dropping of the atomic bomb and the Pacific War could be shared to create a deeper understanding on these topics.

These archives have been featured on Star Trek actor George Takei’s program Takei’s Take, garnering attention in the United States as well. The exhibit of the archives in May 2016 at the Annual International Gathering in North Carolina was also met with praise.

Through these activities we have definitely noticed a response in holding workshops in the United States. Be sure to check out the following articles.

- Atomic Bomb Digital Archives exhibit in the United States (Huffington Post Japan)

Because students from Hiroshima Jogakuin High School who participated in the Hiroshima Archives want to invite President Obama to their high school, "Project Obama" was launched and is currently in development.

The younger generation is beginning new forms of peace activities.

This project is intended to create deeper discussions between Japanese and American youngsters, broaden the understanding of the dangers of atomic warfare, and raise a new generation of youngsters that will contribute to international peace.

As we are now approaching 70 years since the end of the war, there are questions of whether it is necessary to pass on the memories of those who lived through the war to future generations. President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima provides a chance to show Americans that a new form of peace studies is on the rise in the country.

We sincerely hope you will be able to support our efforts.

Rewards

In addition to receiving "special post card" and "conference report" from high school students who attend the Peace Meeting, you will receive the following rewards. Please see "Rewards" for further details.

3,000 yen course

- Your name on the digital archives and a thank you post card

5,000 yen course

- Collection of testimonies from the Hiroshima/Nagasaki / A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 500 yen) / Hidenori Watanave’s A Society Interconnected by Data signed by the author

10,000 yen course

- An original Japan-U.S. Peace Meeting T-shirt / [Limited to 25 supporters] A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 1,000 yen) / A specialty item of Hiroshima selected by high school students / A specialty item of Nagasaki selected by high school students

30,000 yen course

- [Limited to 20 supporters] A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 5,000 yen) / [Limited to 20 supporters] A Harvard University hoodie (equivalent to 5,000 yen)

50,000 yen course

- [Limited to 10 supporters] A Harvard University hoodie and entrance to the Watanave Research Seminar (equivalent to 5,000 yen)

100,000 yen course

- [Limited to 5 supporters] Entrance to a course on designing your own digital archive

300,000 yen course

- [Limited to 1 supporter] An assortment of all the above rewards!

The Nagasaki/Hiroshima Archive team:/span>

- Hidenori Watanave - Associate Professor, Tokyo Metropolitan University and Visiting Scholar, Harvard University
- Tomoyuki Torisu - First Graduating Class, 10,000 High School Student Signature Activities, 3rd Generation Descendant of A-bomb Survivors
- Ryo Osera - Volunteer from Nagasaki, 3rd Generation Descendant of A-bomb Survivors
- Fumioki Okayama - First Graduating Class, 10,000 High School Student Signature Activities, 3rd Generation Descendant of A-bomb Survivors
- Kenya Tamura - Doctoral Program, Tokyo Metropolitan University, from Hiroshima, Volunteer students from Tokyo Metropolitan University
- Shinnosuke Komiya - Master Program, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Volunteer students from Tokyo Metropolitan University
- Shiori Kimura - Master Program, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Volunteer students from Tokyo Metropolitan University

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Select a reward

This purchase agreement will be confirmed when you complete your payment.

Pledge ¥3,000

Your name on the digital archives and a thank you post card
Your name on the digital archives and a thank you post card

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1".

($28.0)
1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives

7backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

(update:Jan.1970)

Pledge ¥5,000

Only 25 left

A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 500 yen)
A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 500 yen)

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($46.7)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
6. A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 500 yen)

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

Pledge ¥5,000

Collection of testimonies from the Hiroshima-Nagasaki archives
Collection of testimonies from the Hiroshima-Nagasaki archives

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.1

($46.7)

. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
5. Collection of testimonies from the Hiroshima/Nagasaki

6backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

(update:Jan.1970)

Pledge ¥5,000

Hidenori Watanave’s A Society Interconnected by Data signed by the author
Hidenori Watanave’s A Society Interconnected by Data signed by the author

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($46.7)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
7. Hidenori Watanave's "A Society Interconnected by Data" signed by the author

5backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

(update:Jan.1970)

Pledge ¥10,000

Only 25 left

A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 1000 yen)
A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 1000 yen)

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($93.5)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
9. A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 1,000 yen)

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

Pledge ¥10,000

A specialty item of Hiroshima selected by high school students
A specialty item of Hiroshima selected by high school students

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($93.5)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
10. A specialty item of Hiroshima selected by high school students

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

Pledge ¥10,000

A specialty item of Nagasaki selected by high school students
A specialty item of Nagasaki selected by high school students

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($93.5)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
11. A specialty item of Nagasaki selected by high school students

1backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

(update:Jan.1970)

Pledge ¥10,000

An original Japan-U.S. Peace Meeting T-shirt
An original Japan-U.S. Peace Meeting T-shirt

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($93.5)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
8. An original Japan-U.S. Peace Meeting T-shirt

2backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

(update:Jan.1970)

Pledge ¥30,000

Only 20 left

A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 5000 yen)
A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 5000 yen)

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($280.4)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
12. A Boston souvenir selected by high school students (equivalent to 5,000 yen)

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

Pledge ¥30,000

Only 20 left

A Harvard University hoodie (equivalent to 5000 yen)
A Harvard University hoodie (equivalent to 5000 yen)

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($280.4)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
13. A Harvard University hoodie (equivalent to 5,000 yen)

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

Pledge ¥50,000

Only 10 left

A Harvard University hoodie and entrance to the Watanave Research Seminar (equivalent to 5000 yen)
A Harvard University hoodie and entrance to the Watanave Research Seminar (equivalent to 5000 yen)

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($467.3)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
13. A Harvard University hoodie (equivalent to 5,000 yen)
14. Entrance to the Watanave Research Seminar

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

Pledge ¥100,000

Only 5 left

Entrance to a course on designing your own digital archive
Entrance to a course on designing your own digital archive

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($934.6)

1. Special thank you post card from students
2. Peace conference report by students
3. Original sticker of Peace conference
4. Your name on the digital archives
--
15. Entrance to a course on designing your own digital archive

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

Pledge ¥300,000

Only 1 left

An assortment of all the above rewards!
An assortment of all the above rewards!

Conversion yen into dollers is based on the rate "107yen = $1”.

($2803.8)

An assortment of all the above rewards!

0backers

Estimated delivery: Mar.2017

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